Wednesday, February 25, 2009

Bill Gates - A Management Example


The picture used above is from the Onion Article.... where Bill Gates gives himself 18 Dexterity and 20 Charisma...


So my friend Joe S. mentioned he saw the blog post on the Bill Gates epic rage email... and suggested the following article on joelonsoftware.com. Apparently this dude used to work at Microsoft back in the day, and he tells a tale of high adventure... ok well not quite high adventure but apparently he was fixing a Date problem in Excel and had his first Bill Gates review... here is an excerpt...

"He was flipping through the spec! [Calm down, what are you a little girl?]

... and THERE WERE NOTES IN ALL THE MARGINS. ON EVERY PAGE OF THE SPEC. HE HAD READ THE WHOLE GODDAMNED THING AND WRITTEN NOTES IN THE MARGINS.

He Read The Whole Thing! [OMG SQUEEE!]
"

The interesting thing about this is.... this truly illustrates the idea of "Stapling yourself to an order..." The idea being... to truly understand your organizational supply chain... you need to literally look at what is going in the trenches.... Here is the HBS article that I read back in B-school.... discussing this.

OMC = order management cycle

They "stapled" themselves to an order in the 18 companies they studied, literally following it through every stage of the OMC. Based on this practical approach, the authors point out potential gaps throughout the OMC. For example, marketing and production battles can erupt even during order planning, and some of the fiercest fighting can break out during scheduling, when the sales force may want quick turnarounds that are unrealistic for manufacturing. Most companies don't see the OMC as a whole system, especially because each phase may require a bewildering overlap of functional responsibilities. However, when managers take the time to track each step of the OMC, they'll come into contact with customer service representatives, production schedulers, shipping clerks, and other critically important people. In this article, first published in 1992, the authors contend that managers who "staple themselves to an order" will not only move horizontally across their own organizations, charting gaps and building information bridges; they'll also see the company from the customer's perspective.

As managers this may seem intuitive... but truly... walking amongst the soldiers isn't a terrible idea.... you may find out quite a bit you had no idea about.... and you may find simply AMAZING things going on..... and by AMAZING I mean completely ridiculous... you may also find.... AMAZINGLY awesome things as well....

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